Christie Purifoy
Christie Purifoy earned a PhD in English literature at the University of Chicago before trading the classroom for an old farmhouse and a garden. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and four children, where she is witness to the seasonal beauty of God's good creation. Her book Roots and Sky: A Journey Home in Four Seasons is out now from Revell. She blogs at www.christiepurifoy.com
14 posts
The Art We Make at the Table

This is a story of two tables. The first is round. The wood is dark, and the square pedestal is cracked. We bought the table as newlyweds. We spent weeks hunting for chairs to match. The six chairs we found were always a little wobbly, but the warm, wood color was just right. It needed sixteen years, but we did, eventually, grow to fill those chairs. Jonathan and myself. Two...

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Sunlight, Shadows, and a Supper Club

When I was younger, I was sure that loneliness was both inevitable and temporary. It was simply the price one paid for moving to a faraway city or taking a new job or joining a different church. Loneliness was a straightforward ailment easily cured in time. Now that I am older, I understand loneliness not as a sickness but a shadow. The sun shines brightly here in the land of...

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In the Habit of Hospitality

I am allergic to goals and averse to resolutions. I love to dream, but I prefer my dreams in rosy shades of vague. Details and action plans make me tired. Oh, January. Oh, month of optimism and ambition. I love you. But I do not trust you. * Or, perhaps, I do not trust myself. For though I am no setter of goals, I, too, long to turn over that...

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Grief, Gratitude, and Turkey Stuffing

Thanksgiving was the first holiday we celebrated after moving to this old red-brick farmhouse in southeastern Pennsylvania. Tomorrow, we will celebrate our fifth Thanksgiving in this place. Is it any wonder I am looking back? Every year, we have roasted a turkey bought from a local Lancaster County farmer. I no longer attempt complicated new recipes because these turkeys are so flavorful. There are many reasons to take good care...

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Invisible Hospitality And An End-of-Summer Cake

Ten years ago, she confessed to me that hospitality wasn’t for her. The tasks that brought me life brought her only unbearable stress. She sloughed off a burden of expectation that wasn’t hers to bear. She said no to hosting friends for dinner and said yes to so many other good things. * Today, that same friend is mom to a houseful of kids. They arrived through birth and adoption...

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What Hospitality Looks Like in a Castle

As a writer, I abhor a cliché, and I am no fan of idioms and proverbs. I prefer my words fresh and perhaps a little startling. I like words that wake us up and rattle our usual ways of thinking and seeing. We say if these walls could talk, but what if the creaky floorboards have more important things to declare? We say a man’s home is his castle, but...

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Comfort Food For Those Who Mourn

Today is gray and chilly, and raindrops are sliding down the window slowly, like tears. It is the last hour before dinner, and I am scrambling to write this post for Grace Table. My husband is traveling for work this week, and I left the sitter with the kids and a big pot of slowly thawing soup. I had most of the day to work, a rare thing, but I...

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Tea and Toast: Why We Love to Read About Food

Some of my favorite memories of life around the table involve foods I’ve never eaten and gatherings I’ve never attended. Only murmur the words sardines on toast, and I will sigh with pleasure. I have never tasted that precise combination, but many times I have sat by the fire with Lucy and Mr. Tumnus, warming my hands with a teacup and listening to the sleepy singing of his flute. I...

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The Irrational Hospitality of Advent

The definition of hospitality seems simple enough. Hospitality means to receive a guest -- friend or stranger -- with goodwill. But what does that really look like? In a year of stories here at Grace Table, we have only begun to describe it. It looks like tea parties with children. It looks like food for the strangers who are also our neighbors. It looks like hilarious family traditions. It is last-minute invitations and...

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We Are All Picky Eaters

The Ten Commandments say nothing about picky eaters. I know this, yet I’ll be honest and tell you I just now double checked to be sure. Now I want to attach an asterisk at “honor your father and your mother, so that you may live long” (Ex 20:12). Surely, eating all of your broccoli is implied? I remain convinced that picky eating is a serious moral flaw, even if there was...

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